Best of 2008: Craftlog

Maitreya has been writing the wonderful Craftlog since April 2003. She has consistently been one of my favorite sources for fabric, sewing, and quilting inspiration. She also responsible for the Marthadex, a searchable index of Martha Stewart Living magazine, and crafting japanese, a blog of Japanese crafting books with ISBNs for your international shopping convenience. Here are her picks for her favorite fabrics and textile-related stories of 2008.

 

Best Trend: DIY fabric design, from Spoonflower to small-scale Etsy screen-printers to homemade prints a la the Lotta Jansdotter and Lena Corwin books.

 

Best Spoonflower Designs:

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Persimmon by juneprints

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Various swatches by dozidesign (web)

and Wood by troismiettes.

 

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Best Japanese: I really like the new Kokka collection. These big graphic trees in particular just cry out to be appliqued to something.

 

Best Linens for Repurposing: Close between Anthropologie, Urban Outfitters, and IKEA, but the edge probably goes to IKEA for more reasonable prices. Just this year, I made a tote bag from a tablecloth, a bag from a tapestry, a holiday garland and a necklace from a pillowcase, a skirt using a sheet, and a baby quilt using a curtain.

 

Best Solid: The increasing availability (in the U.S., anyway) of luscious thick felt

 

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Best Reproduction Line: Come Quilt With Me (by designer Pat Yamin). The aqua/gold/orange/brown color scheme is a classic.

 

Best Under the Radar: Add another puzzled vote for Lush! The possibility that woodgrain and paint-by-number deer might not be a sure thing proves the existence of an alternate crafting universe outside the web.

 

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Best Novelty: I love this Japanese pattern from Yuwa of blueprints for a house, which includes plans for a delightful-sounding “relaxing room.”

 

Favorite Designer: Skinny laMinx. Not a fabric designer, per se, but I love her papercut art and how that translates to fabric.

{Thank you so much, Maitreya!}