Best of 2008: Blempgorf’s Picks

Jenny writes one of my favorite quilting/sewing/baking blogs, Blempgorf. She’s also a vintage fabric collector and was a guest curator for the Daily Swatch a few months ago. Here are her picks for standout fabrics in 2008:

underwatersistersjug1

Underwater Sisters in Jughandle, part of Heather Ross’ Mendocino collection

Best Quilting Weight Cotton Collection: Mendocino by Heather Ross for FreeSpirit

I’ve loved Heather Ross fabrics since I first saw her Munki Munki lines and the illustrations with this latest line are just as delightful as her previous efforts. But what is extra special about this line are the colors — I love the unexpected combinations. Browns with mustards and blues, the purples with yellows and fuchsia — they are unusual and striking. (And her blog is one of the most eloquent in blogland.)

citylimitsblankquilting

Best Under the Radar/Sleeper Collection: City Limits by Blank Quilting

These sketches of city scenes are very sweet. They remind me of illustrations in my picture books from childhood.

lecienpolkadot

One of the gazillion different polka dots in Lecien’s Color Basic Collection

Best Geometric Print: Just about anything in the Color Basic collection by Lecien, but especially the polka dots

It is lovely to find a line of interesting and subtle prints to use as secondary fabrics in a quilt. This collection has a number of gems that fit the bill, with neat combinations of less common colors — like corals with black dots, dark gray dots on light gray background, and burgundy fabric with gray dots. In all, a very useful line of fabric.

cx3762_multi

Best Juvenile Print: Merryville in Michael Miller’s Tot Town collection

The design has great colors and a lot of detail to look at. I like this one as the back on a baby quilt, where it can serve double duty as a playmat for a little tyke to steer around some Hot Wheels.

cheddarpoisongreen

Best Reproduction Collection: Cheddar and Poison Green by Nancy Gere for Windham Fabrics

I seldom use reproduction prints from eras before the 1920s or so, but the color story on this line is simply terrific. I think they could be used in a very modern way by cherry picking some of the simpler prints and incorporating some solid fabrics. Plus the name is pretty great as well.

{Thanks, Jenny!}

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